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Award-winning SEPUP assessment system

In our SEPUP developed programs in middle school and high school biology, student progress is measured through assessments embedded in the students’ daily work. These tasks assess students on one or more of the assessment variables and pairs with more typical formative and summative classroom assessment. The diagram below illustrates the three core components of SEPUP's assessment system and teacher support.

Core components of the sepup assessment system

assessment chart temp

 

For each assessment, a sample “complete and correct” response is provided

This is an example assessing the variable Evidence and Trade-Offs.

Question from student text:

You find out that NIH has only enough money to fund one study and plans to fund the best one. Explain which study you would fund. Support your answer with evidence and identify the trade-offs of your decision.

Hint: To write a complete answer, first state your opinion. Provide two or more pieces of evidence that support your opinion. Then consider all sides of the issue and identify the trade-offs of your decision.

Sample response from teacher text:

I think that the clinical trial of the summer fever medicine should be funded if it is rewritten. It should have a control group and look for side effects. Study 2 has a better design, with a control group and a large sample size. But the burns aren’t as serious as summer fever. The medicine for summer fever is the most important of the studies because it could keep kids from getting sick or dying. Summer fever is spreading and this could help stop it. So this is the study I would fund. The trade-off of my decision is that researchers who wrote better designed studies will not get any money. Also, people with burns, people who are overweight, and pregnant women who don’t want to feel sick will not get any help.

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Understanding Concepts (from the Ecology Unit)

A second-grader comes up to you and says, "We just learned that the sun made all the stuff in my lunch. But my lunch was a tuna sandwich." Using language a second-grader would understand, explain how the sun was the original source of the energy in the tuna sandwich.

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Evidence and Trade-offs (from the Bioengineering unit)

Explain whether you would recommend your energy bar as a healthy snack. Support your answer with quantitative evidence and identify the trade-offs of your decision. (Hint: To write a complete answer, first state your opinion. Provide two or more pieces of evidence that support your opinion. Then consider all sides of the issue and identify the trade-offs of your decision.)