Please join us in Los Angeles for our workshops in Room 402AB and visit our Booth #1126 for a hands-on science experience.

Don't forget to add our research-based, field-tested, and hands-on workshops to your schedule.

THURSDAY 3/30/2017


WAVES - MAKE AN ABSTRACT CONCEPT BECOME VISIBLE!
10:00-11:30am

Presented by: Lisa Kelp with Lab-Aids, Inc.
Experience two exemplary NGSS aligned activities from SEPUP that build up to MS-PS4-2. Anchored in the context of health issues around various types and levels of wave exposure, these workshop activities model seamless integration of the three-dimensions, ELA, math standards. We will explore the relationship between visible light frequency and energy through the use of a phosphorescent material and use light boxes to explore reflection and refraction.

INTRODUCING THE LAB-MASTER
12:00-01:30pm

Presented by: Andrew Uy, Loyola High School of Los Angeles
Many schools are no longer allowing the use of an open flame in the classroom but the solution should never be to eliminate student labs! This workshop focuses on the Lab Master - an innovative device designed to minimize safety concerns without compromising the integrity of science instruction. Recently contracted for all NYC public schools, the unit safely boils up to 50 mL of water in 3-5 minutes, contains a built-in RGB spectrophotometer, and includes temperature and voltage probes. Join us for a hands-on look at the Lab-Master and sample labs that feature its use.

CHEMICAL FORMULA AND AMINO ACIDS
2:00-3:30pm

Presented by: Andrew Uy, Loyola High School of Los Angeles
What is the difference between subscripts and coefficients? What does balancing a chemical equation mean? Many students have trouble with these fundamental concepts in chemistry. If a student does not fully understand the chemical formula, then moles, reactions, and stoichiometry are hopelessly confusing. Join us for some elegant, intuitive, and well-differentiated lessons that allow students of all levels to master the chemical formula and thereby move confidently into a deeper understanding of chemistry.
Student Pages

CALLING ALL CARBONS
4:00-5:30pm

Presented by: Lisa Martin-Hansen, Department Chair, Science Education, California State University, Long Beach
The element carbon is critical to life on Earth. All living organisms contain different and essential carbon-based molecules. Several Earth processes work together to cycle carbon from one carbon reservoir to another and to keep the amount in each reservoir stable. We will model learn about and model different carbon transfer processes in this exemplary NGSS activity developed by EDC and the Oceans of Data Institute.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

FRIDAY 3/31/2017

READING RIVER SEDIMENTS
10:00-11:30am

Presented by: Lisa Martin-Hansen, Department Chair, Science Education, California State University, Long Beach
In this exemplary NGSS activity we explore the issue of how valuable earth minerals are formed and how the location and use of these resources effect us. Role-playing as a mining company, we prospect for mineral ore by following traces in river sediments and then evaluating the trade-offs of our choices - both for the company and the environment. This is a highly engaging lesson developed for HS Earth science by EDC and Oceans of Data Institute.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

CUTTING CANYONS
12:00-1:30pm

Presented by:Lisa Kelp, Lab-Aids, Inc.
Turn a stream table demo into an opportunity for students run experiments at their own desks! Using the Lab-Aids Mini Stream Table we investigate the dynamics of stream erosion and deposition and how it relates to the issue of increasing population and development needs in a fictitious town. This activity is developed by SEPUP using results from field-testing and research in best-practice.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND GENE EXPRESSION
2:00-3:30pm

Presented by: Virginia Rehberg, Wilson High School, Tacoma, WA
Students often have trouble conceptualizing how selective gene expression works. In this workshop, we will use manipulatives to teach this concept and explain how it is connected to the issue of genetic engineering. This innovative activity is selected from Science and Global Issues: Biology - a truly unique published Biology program developed by SEPUP at the Lawrence Hall of Science.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND CELLULAR RESPIRATION
4:00-5:30pm

Presented by: Virgina Rehberg, Wilson High School, Tacoma, WA
Students have major misconceptions about photosynthesis and cellular respiration, but this content is essential for understanding foundational concepts in Biology. Using a computer simulation, a hands-on activity, and notebooking strategies, we can expose student thinking and provide structure for them to self-correct. Also a model activity for embedded literacy supports in science. All from Science and Global Issues: Biology - a truly unique published Biology program developed by SEPUP at the Lawrence Hall of Science.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

SATURDAY 4/01/2017

MODELING THE INTRODUCTION OF A NEW SPECIES - NGSS ECOLOGY
10:00-11:30am

Presented by: Donna Markey, Science Teacher, San Diego, CA
How does a new species affect the flow of matter and energy in an ecosystem? This card sort style activity models the introduction of a new species with special attention to the effect on existing predators and producers. From the new SEPUP middle level Ecology unit, revised and updated for the NGSS and published by Lab-Aids. Participants will receive free samples of the activity.

CONVECTION CURRENTS AND CONTINENTAL DRIFT
12:00-1:30pm

Presented by: Donna Markey, Science Teacher, San Diego, CA
What forces drive the major land masses of the Earth via continental drift? We will investigate and model convection currents and how they relate to geological activity - a significant consideration when evaluating sites to store nuclear waste and the main issue supporting this unit developed by SEPUP.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

MAKE A WET-CELL BATTERY
2:00-3:30pm

Presented by: Donna Markey, Science Teacher, San Diego, CA
Although we live a battery-powered lifestyle, most of us (middle school and high school students included) have no idea how batteries actually work. In this hands-on workshop, we will engage in an activity from SEPUP that was developed using results from field-testing and research in best-practice. Make a wet cell battery, explore the effect of using different metal electrodes on battery output, and consider ways to reduce the number of discarded batteries in the waste stream.
Student Pages / Teacher Pages

Let us bring Lab-Aids to you!

Can't attend this event? We'll schedule an event in your area so you can see our program in action.